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Tension as scientists raise alarm on new virus in China found in Chinese pigs





- Chinese scientists have found a deadly virus in pigs in China as they studied different viruses from 2011 to 2018

- The scientists advised that those who work in the swine industry need to be closely monitored to prevent another outbreak

- According to them, a lot of people who share proximity with pig farms are at greater risk of contracting the virus

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Scientists have alerted the public of a new flu virus resident in Chinese pigs, saying it has become even more infectious and dangerous to humans and needs to be closely monitored so it does not become another pandemic.

Reuters, however, reports that the study by the scientists said the virus threat is not imminent. The discovery was made when a team of researchers assessed influenza viruses found in pigs from 2011 to 2018.

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They found a G4 strain of H1N1 which has all the features of being a pandemic. The paper of the study was published by the US Journal, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).

It was also discovered that people who work on pig farms have a high amount of the virus in their bloodstreams, adding that it is important to monitor workers in the swine industry.

A picture showing scientists testing pigs for likely viruses. Photo source: Reuters

A picture showing scientists testing pigs for likely viruses. Photo source: Reuters
Source: UGC

There was also the fear associated with the risk of the virus affecting Chinese regions where many live closely with farms, slaughterhouses, and wet markets.

It should be noted that in 2009, China restricted international flights so that the outbreak of avian H1N1 does not affect other countries.

Meanwhile, Legit.ng earlier reported that just minutes before dying, a 26-year-old coronavirus patient documented his last moments in a selfie video he sent to his father on Friday night, June 26.

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The video showed him saying that he could not breathe as the ventilator was taken off him by doctors. By Sunday, June 28, the video had become a massive sensation online.

In the clip, the man also accused health officials of earlier ignoring his call for oxygen for three hours. The deceased’s dad did the final rites for his son on Saturday, June 27.

“They have removed ventilator… My heart has stopped and only lungs are working, but I am unable to breathe, daddy. Bye daddy, bye all, bye daddy,” he said.

The hospital, however, dismissed the allegation the deceased made, saying that he was at a very medically bad state that he could not sense the supply of oxygen being given to him.

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Chuka (Webby) Aniemeka
Chuka (Webby) Aniemeka

Chuka is an experienced certified web developer with an extensive background in computer science and 18+ years in web design &development. His previous experience ranges from redesigning existing website to solving complex technical problems with object-oriented programming. Very experienced with Microsoft SQL Server, PHP and advanced JavaScript. He loves to travel and watch movies.

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