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Attempt to sabotage Zimbabwean economy and create instability before elections





Scientists believe that the fastest thing ever lived is light. But Zimbabwe has proved that wrong, gossip and rumour travels faster than light in Zimbabwe. It took one idiot to fly a video and two lunatics to type speculations in a twinkling of an eye the prices skyrocketed the basic commodities disappeared over night.

It is easy to blame the opposition but the reality and the truth is that there are those in power benefiting from this economic confusion. It's already been a difficult 2017 for investors and masses alike. but if history is any indication, it's not going to get any better. Why? Because markets tend to fall in the last year before elections. The worst drop was in in 2008, when the market fell by about 500 percent.

While there are plenty of reasons why equities may struggle this year, such as falling oil prices and slowing global growth, election-related uncertainty and ZANU PF own infighting isn't helping, The endless rallies are not addressing the economy but dressing down each other. It is the economy the country and the party who suffer most. Corruption is being celebrated openly and none action of the police is taunted as victory. This leads to total collapse of the economy and indeed untold suffering of the masses. The irresponsible talks of Mawarire and the buzz on the Social media only helps to destroy the economy and indeed the country.

The way factions are tearing the party apart is so alarming and one wonders if there is no one seeing something. The country's situation now resembles a dog's breakfast. Confusion runs the strings.

People are so scared to speak up in fear of victimisation. The way we are grinding the nation to a hold we will have no nation to rule. We will be left with no country to talk about if we are to follow our selfish factional ways to lead us. In order to create anarchy and starve people to rebellion the party is giving in to factions and nobody is seeing sense out of it. We need to Stop it and concentrate on the country. It is naive for the opposition to smile at Zanu PF throwing spears at each other. What they do not know is that it is their children's future the spears are aimed at.

Come 2018 Zimbabwe will have a new president, but who that will be is still very much to be determined. That lack of clarity isn't good for the markets. "People don't like the upheaval and uncertainty of an open-ended race, now trying to campaign by destroying the country is idiotic and surely unpatriotic. As well, people who are in the factional fights are often less predictable than they are in previous years, which adds to the uncertainty. They're "lame duck politicians with little political capital left, so they push through their agendas and counterproductive initiatives by executive orders and any other means possible. They jostle to be recognised by the powers that be at the expense of their constituencies. This stands in contrast to the ethos of the party. Since incumbents are generally reelected, markets don't panic nearly as much. But the panic we are experiencing now is self destructive and helps no one. The people are the losers in this debacle.

There is a chance that the year won't end up as badly as in the past, but it depends on who people think will win the control of the country. If stocks rise then people are generally of the mind that the incumbent party will win. If equities fall, then the thinking is that a new party will take over, Again, it relates to uncertainty — as the saying goes, better the devil you know than the devil you don't. This is actually what plays out in the polls, We need to 'fix our politics' we need to fix our security. Individual sectors could also experience more ups and downs in the run-up to the election. Once candidates are chosen and party platforms are revealed, investors will have a better sense as to what industries might either benefit or suffer, depending on who's elected. While those platforms are still to be determined, industry will decline.

could see a rebound if investors think that the Republicans, which tend to favor less stringent air-quality regulations, will take Why markets tend to fall during a presidential election year Bryan Borzykowski, special to CNBC.com Published 9:30 AM ET Wed, 13 Jan 2016 Updated 11:50 AM ET Wed, 13 Jan 2016 CNBC.com It's already been a difficult 2016 for investors — the S&P 500 is down about 5.1 percent since the start of the year — but if history is any indication, it's not going to get any better. Why? Because markets tend to fall in the last year of a president's second term. Since 1900, the S&P 500 has, on average, fallen by 1.2 percent in year 8, with the market rising only 44 percent of the time. The worst drop was in George W. Bush's last term, in 2008, when the market fell by about 41 percent. Down chart stocks Saul Gravy | Getty Images While there are plenty of reasons why equities may struggle this year, such as falling oil prices and slowing global growth, election-related uncertainty isn't helping, said Jeff Hirsch, editor in chief of the "Stock Trader's Almanac," a popular investment newsletter.

Come November, America will have a new president, but who that will be is still very much to be determined. That lack of clarity isn't good for the markets. "People don't like the upheaval and uncertainty of an open-ended race," he explained. As well, presidents who are in the final year of a second term are often less predictable than they are in previous years, which adds to the uncertainty. They're "lame duck presidents," said Hirsch, "with little political capital left, so they push through policy initiatives by executive orders and any other means possible." This stands in contrast to the final year of a president's first term. Since incumbents are generally reelected, markets don't panic nearly as much. Since 1900, the S&P 500 has gained an average of 11.5 percent and has risen 83 percent of the time in year 4, said Sam Stovall, managing director of U.S. equity strategy for S&P Capital IQ. Pay attention in August

There is a chance that the year won't end up as badly as in the past, but it depends on who investors think will win the election. If stocks rise between July 31 and October 31, then people are generally of the mind that the incumbent party will win. If equities fall, then the thinking is that a new party will take over, said Stovall. Again, it relates to uncertainty — as the saying goes, better the devil you know than the devil you don't. This actually plays out in the polls, said Stovall. In 82 percent of the times that markets have climbed during August and October, the incumbent party has won. In 86 percent of the times the market has been down, the replacement party has won. Read MoreObama in State of the Union: We need to 'fix our politics' Individual sectors could also experience more ups and downs in the run-up to the election. Once candidates are chosen and party platforms are revealed, investors will have a better sense as to what industries might either benefit or suffer, depending on who's elected. While those platforms are still to be determined, the rumour mill will be spinning big time. Issues of government programmes , usually involving higher taxes, more spending and more regulation are implemented, it begins to negatively impact business profits and consumers.

With the presidential election cycle theory pointing to a sluggish year in 2018 coupled with other issues, like none action on corruption investors need to remain cautious.

Now people have printed new bond notes to clean the streets off the US dollar. If the minister is not aware how can one explain the presence of new bond notes in our streets but none in the bank. If that money is genuine where is it coming from. Who is authorising its illegal circulation. Why is nobody being arrested. For how long shall we groan and moan. The authority to arrest must be given now. Peoole in High Offices are benefiting from this problem. It is true that some one's riches are watered by some one's sweat. But our freedom finds its roots in our blood. We must not play election games with issues of bread and butter. We must not blame the opposition when we are holding the keys to normalcy.

This economic madness must be stopped once and for all. This overnight change in our economy must not be allowed to prevail. Those causing it must be arrested regardless of their faction. This price hike nonsense this cash shortages this fuel shortages all this should be stopped once and for all. Would there be anything to rule if the country is taken by the wave of sabotage swept away by the corruption and money mongering greedyy vampires in our economic sectors and power corridors. Clean campaigning takes no prisoners.

Vazet2000@yahoo.co.uk

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Chuka (Webby) Aniemeka
Chuka (Webby) Aniemeka

Chuka is an experienced certified web developer with an extensive background in computer science and 18+ years in web design &development. His previous experience ranges from redesigning existing website to solving complex technical problems with object-oriented programming. Very experienced with Microsoft SQL Server, PHP and advanced JavaScript. He loves to travel and watch movies.

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